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No-Cook Homemade Play Dough 🎄Christmas Tree DIY Craft

We all had so much fun making our no-cook homemade play dough. 

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What you will need (double up if you would like to make more):

  • 1 cup of white all-purpose flour,
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil,
  • 1/4 cup of salt,
  • 1 tablespoon of cream of tartar,
  • 3/4 cups of boiling water (adding in increments),
  • food coloring (we are using this neon food coloring set),
  • 1 tsp of glycerine for shine,
  • we also added Lavender essential oil to add some olfactory dimension to our play dough (do omit it if you have smaller children who might otherwise put play dough in the mouth, since other than this ingredient, the playdough is safe if ingested).

DSC_0070An invitation to create: Can you make a Christmas Tree?

DSC_0071There are so many ways you can use a cookie cutter!

DSC_0075 copy  We are using a wooden dough roller from this set.

DSC_0075 copyOffer a child to roll the dough and cut out a shape with a cookie cutter. 

DSC_0075 copyInvite your child to make tiny balls to decorate the Tree.

DSC_0075This is a fun way to promote fine motor control while exploring creativity.  

DSC_0066 didnotSee how we made our No-Cook Homemade 🌈 Play Dough here.

For more on Christmas activities, see here "🎄Christmas Odd & Even Math lesson (Numerals and Counters)." And here "🎄Christmas Tree from Montessori Number Rods and Knobless Cylinders." 

For Christmas sensorial activities, see here "🎅🏻Christmas Inspired • Fill The Ornament 🎄Sensory Bin" and  here "🎅🏻Christmas Inspired ⛄️Shredded Paper 🙌🏻Sensory Bin with 🔢Math Twist."

 

 

 

 


No-Cook Homemade 🌈 Play Dough

Finally, we made no-cook homemade play dough inspired by so many talented Mamas. This particular recipe is by Imagination Tree House (see here). I will keep you up with updates as to how well the dough stores. 

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What you will need (double up if you would like to make more):

  • 1 cup of white all-purpose flour,
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil,
  • 1/4 cup of salt,
  • 1 tablespoon of cream of tartar,
  • 3/4 cups of boiling water (adding in increments),
  • food coloring (we are using this neon food coloring set),
  • 1 tsp of glycerine for shine,
  • we also added Lavender essential oil to add some olfactory dimension to our play dough (do omit it if you have smaller children who might otherwise put play dough in the mouth, since other than this ingredient, the playdough is safe if ingested).

DSC_0056-3How to make your play dough:

  • mix the flour, salt, cream of tartar and oil in a large mixing bowl,
  • stir in water continuously until it becomes a sticky combined mixture,
  • add the glycerine to give your dough a nice shine,
  • add essential oil (optional),
  • allow the dough to cool down and then knead it for few minutes until all of the stickiness has gone (add more flour if it is too sticky).

DSC_0067The key is to keep kneading continuously until the dough does not feel sticky anymore!
DSC_0067We first made 12 plain balls and then added a different color to each.
DSC_0067An hour later...

See here our playdough in action in a post "No-Cook Homemade Play Dough 🎄Christmas Tree DIY Craft."

For more on color mixing, see  here a video-post "👔 Father's Day🎈Balloon Color-mixing DIY Craft (Sensorial 🖐️👀👂👅👃 Activities 101 🎥 Series 🎇)."  And, see here a 🎥 video post "Paper Towel, Markers and 💦Water 🌈 Color Mixing ⚗️Experiment."


Paper Towel, Markers and 💦Water 🌈 Color Mixing ⚗️Experiment (🔬⚗️⚖️Science meets 🎨Art 101 🎥Series 🎇)

Today, we are exploring colors while creating patterns on a paper towel, and thereafter experimenting with water and color mixing, coming up with a new art piece, different than the original.

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What you will need:

  • paper towel (we are using Bounty),
  • Sharpies (buy thin point here and thick here), markers and/or highlighters,
  • droppers (we are using silicone bulb dropper from this set),
  • water.

Paper Towel, Markers and Water Color Mixing Experiment from Anya on Vimeo.

DSC_0006 Adrian's art before adding water.

DSC_0006 Did you notice that where children used Sharpies, the colors did not "bleed" or mix as much?
DSC_0006Julia's artwork after adding water. 

The water travels through paper diluting and mixing colors. This process is similar to our Capillary Action Science Experiment below, where I describe the process in details.

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See here "💛💙❤️Primary Colors, 💦Water & Paper Capillary Action ⌛️Timelapse ⚗️ Kids Science Experiment (🌈 Rainbow Walking Water). "  

For more on color mixing, see here a video-post "👔 Father's Day🎈Balloon Color-mixing DIY Craft (Sensorial 🖐️👀👂👅👃 Activities 101 🎥 Series 🎇)." 

For more on Science experiments, see here a video-post "Lava Lamp: Oil vs 🌈 💧Water Density Immiscibility ⚗️Experiment with 💥Alka Seltzer."

See all our 🔬⚗️⚖️ Science Experiments here.


🎃Halloween Inspired 🌽Corn 🙌Sensory 🚜 Bin & 🚜Tractors 📚Books

Tactile sensory stimulation involves the sensation of touch and texture. Exposing children to sensory play helps them develop and refine the use of their senses. Most importantly, sensory bins provide hours of imaginative small world play, fostering creativity, independence, and concentration. Pretend play can also be a form of imitation of the real adult world, which can promote child's development in many ways. Small world play has potentials for teaching children about themselves and the world around them by developing their cognitive, fine motor, and self-help skills. Moreover, through pretend play, children develop their speech and language skills by naming objects they play with: such as a tractor, a farm, harvest, etc., thus teaching them appropriate social and pragmatic skills. Children also use play to understand the world around them and are thus developing their social-emotional skills. Moreover, small world-play is a way for children to relive things that have happened to them, thus allowing them to increase understanding of their life events. 

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 What you will need:

  • we are using a wooden box to contain the filler: dried corn;
  • Halloween pumpkins for scooping;
  • pom poms and Halloween styrofoam covered balls for tonging; (see here 🍁Fall 👻Halloween Inspired Tongs Transferring, Montessori 🙌🏻 Practical Life);
  • a sorting ice-making tray to transfer and sort retrieved items to;
  • 🚜 tractors for small world play;
  • are transferring tools (we are using tongs and spoons). 

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Adrian is ready for scooping, tonging and transferring with this 🌽 corn, Pom poms, and spooky 👻👁eyeballs sensory invitation to play! 🚜Tractors can pull the heavy load, while 👦🏼Adrian will do the rest.

DSC_0009Scooping and filling up a pumpkin requires concentration and precision.
DSC_0009Tonging is a great exercise to develop fine-motor control.
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 As a result of this sensory invitation to play: 

  • Adrian stimulated tactile sense of touch by feeling the texture of the 🌽 corn;
  • he also exercised fine-motor skills by incorporating practical life activity such as scooping  and tonging pop poms and styrofoam balls (more on tonging here);
  • the visual sense of sight was also stimulated by having to find, shape-discriminate and sort pop poms and styrofoam balls;
  • and most importantly, it was fun since Adrian loves the farm and tractors! 

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Small world play offers children an opportunity to take on the opposite role, which allows them to see things from another’s perspective. To feel a sense of control and power, children often take on an adult role, so that they can be us - the parents! In their play, they can independently drive a tractor, sow seeds or feed a cow ... possibilities are endless! What we can do as adults is offer a safe, thoughtful and stimulating prepared environment. 
DSC_0024-2We have collected some great books which enrich our small-world play:

  •  The Ultimate Construction Site Book (buy here) is packed with more than 60 tabbed moving parts to pull, lift, and explore; as well as the meticulous details of vehicles, buildings, and techniques.
  • The Ultimate Book of Vehicles book (buy here) reveals supersized spreads, featuring marvelously detailed illustrations with lots of flaps, pop-ups, pull-tabs, and rotating wheels, bringing many vehicles to life.

DSC_0027Tractors My First Discoveries book (buy here) offers bright and colorful illustrations, some with clear over-lay pages which adds a new dimension to a traditional reading. We explored this book here in a "🌽 Corn Sensory Bin with 🔤 Alphabet Letters (🙌Sensorial + Language) & 🚜Tractors 📚Book" post.
DSC_0027This sensorial small world invitation to play was a true learning through play experience!

For more on sensory play, see here "Sensory Exploration with Hydro Gel ❤️️ Water Beads (Science 🔬⚗️⚖️ 101 🎥Series 🎇)," and here "✨The Universe 👋🏻Sensory Bin (🌌COSMOS Unit Study)."

For more on Autumn-themed activities, read here a roundup of all our activities we have done during the month of 🍂September and 🎃October: over 20 of them! arranged by the area of study in a post "🍂Fall & 🎃Halloween Inspired Homeschooling 101 Unit Study."


DIY Sandpaper Letter "S" (Montessori 🔠 101 Language)

Montessori Sandpaper letters are a traditional language material used to introduce a child to letters and their sounds, but with a twist: besides visual stimulation of perceiving the symbol (seeing the shape commonly agreed upon to represent a particular sound), a child is also able to sensorily feel the shape of the letter as he/she enunciates the name of the letter and the sound it makes.

Although you can purchase sandpaper letters (buy the upper case here or a bundle here or here), they are very easy to make at home. According to Montessori language curriculum guidelines, pink color represents a consonant, while blue - a vowel.

DSC_0210What you will need to make this tactile sandpaper letter:

  • pink cardstock since we are making a consonant letter (you would use blue cardstock for a vowel);
  • sand (you can also use salt, sugar, polenta, Amaranth, or any other tiny grain);
  • and glue.

DSC_0211First, offer a child to squeeze glue following the letter's template. 
DSC_0211Next, pour sand over the glue and let it dry.   DSC_0229

Since we could control how much glue and sand to apply to the template, our tactile sandpaper letter "S" came out even thicker than a traditional one you would purchase, offering a child a more intense sensory experience. 
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See here a ✂️DIY 📽 video on how we made sandpaper 🔢 numbers. Also, see here "Letter "S" (🔠 Letter Series)" post. 

For more on our Language curriculum and the Phonetical order sets, read here the introductory post: "Montessori Phonetical Order of presenting ABCs Alphabet letters." For individual letters, read here our 🔠 Letter Series (Montessori Language) post.